Atlanta Cars Vs. Motorcycles: Share the Road, Stay Alert and Save a Motorcyclist’s Life

At Southtowne, we’ve see first hand the effects of what you are about to read. I haven’t written about this subject before and was giving it some thought the other day as I saw a large group of motorcyclists out for a Sunday ride. I thought to myself how many times, as I was driving, that a motorcycle either crept up on me, was in my blind spot or I flat out just didn’t see him because I wasn’t thinking about the possibility of a bike near my driving space. It’s more than once, I’ll admit to that.

One thing as drivers that we are all responsible for are the safety of our fellow travelers. That includes, most importantly, cyclists who are often the victims of careless driving from a passenger vehicle. Remember we share the road. We are responsible for controlling every lane change we make, every short stop we make and especially the safety of others on the road.

I did a little research into it and this is what I found at trafficsafety.org:

Two-Vehicle Crashes Facts

  • In 2006, 2,537 (51%) of all motorcycles involved in fatal crashes collided with another type of motor vehicle while in motion. ┬áIn two-vehicle crashes, 79% of the motorcycles involved were impacted in the front. Only 5% were struck in the rear.
  • 55% of all fatalities in motorcycle crashes in 2006 involved another vehicle in addition to the motorcycle in the crash.
  • In 2006, there were 2,226 two-vehicle fatal crashes involving a motorcycle and another type of vehicle. In 40% (883) of these crashes, the other vehicle was turning left while the motorcycle was going straight, passing, or overtaking the vehicle. Both vehicles were going straight in 582 crashes (26%).
  • 93% of all two-vehicle crashes involving a motorcycle and a passenger vehicle in which the motorcycle operator died, occurred on non-interstate roadways.
  • In 2006, 51% of all two-vehicle crashes involving a motorcycle and a passenger vehicle in which the motorcycle operator died, were intersection crashes.
  • In two-vehicle motorcycle crashes involving a motorcycle and another type of vehicle, in 40% of the crashes the other vehicle was turning left when the motorcycle was going straight, passing, or overtaking the vehicle.

Now folks, these stats are 6 years old, their numbers, I can only assume, have increased. We all know that motorcycles are far less crash-worthy than closed vehicles. They are also less visible to other drivers and pedestrians and less stable than four-wheel vehicles. Operating a motorcycle requires a different combination of physical and mental skills than those used in driving four-wheel vehicles. Motorcyclists and their passengers are more vulnerable to the hazards of weather, traffic and road conditions than drivers in closed vehicles. So please keep this in mind when you are changing lanes, making turns, or God forbid, using your cell phones while driving (it’s better you don’t do this last one for all of our sakes). Thank you for your continued safe driving in your Atlanta car.

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