The Dangers Of Atlanta Railroad Crossings

You may not have ever considered it, but many drivers in Atlanta have, and that’s tempting fate by crossing train tracks as a train is barreling down the tracks. Your Atlanta GM dealer, the Southtowne General Motors Superstore wants to remind you that crossing barriers to avoid waiting for a train to pass is dumb and illegal. You not only put yourself in the path of extreme danger, but you are endangering those who are actually abiding by the law and waiting for the train to pass as well as the engineer of the train.

You might be thinking, “do people really go around railroad barriers”? The simple answer is absolutely they do. In fact, I’m surprised that we don’t have more incidents involving fatal interactions between car and train.

Of course, not all railroad crossings are clearly marked with guard gates or lights, there are some in rural areas that are simply marked with the standard railroad “X”. As you’ll see in the video below, even when driving in a familiar area and crossing a well known railroad intersection can still be extremely dangerous.

The following statistics were provided by car-accidents.com:

According to the US Department of Transportation there are about 5,800 vehicle train crashes each year in the United States-usually at Railroad crossings. These accidents kill 600 people and injure about 2,300. More than 50% of all railroad fatal accidents occur at crossings with passive, or inadequate safety devices (often none at all!). During daylight about 75% of car train collisions involve the train hitting the car, while at night about 50% of the time the car runs into the train!

The bottom line is that you should never, ever cross railroad tracks when the guard arms have been lowered. Even further, you should always expect the unexpected when crossing at any train intersection.

As always, the Southtowne General Motors Superstore just wants you to use your head when you are on the road. Don’t take any chances with your life and try to beat any on-coming train. It’s just common sense, folks.

 

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